November 29, 2022

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Food delivery drivers spill secrets to get orders fast

High gas prices are hitting everyone, but some people feeling it the most right now are food delivery drivers. Now that delivering food is getting more expensive for them, drivers tell us they’re getting picky about which orders they accept. That means food delivery apps could lose their convenience for you. Watch the video above: Our Chief National Consumer Correspondent Jeff Rossen talks with food delivery drivers about how we can help them get us our food at a faster rate. What are companies doing for their drivers? DoorDash DoorDash launched a Gas Rewards program to offset elevated gas prices and preserve drivers’ earning potential. Drivers are able to earn 10% cash back on gas through a card called DasherDirect. This card can be used even when the drivers aren’t on the job. The company also launched a “Weekly Gas Bonus for Those Who Dash Most” initiative. Each week, Dashers who accept and complete orders totaling 100 miles with their vehicle, will earn an extra $5. Those extra earnings will increase the more they deliver. For example, for 175 miles, drivers earn an extra $10. These relief programs will be in place through April but the company says it will monitor prices to evolve the program as needed. GrubHub GrubHub says it’s increasing driver pay given current gas prices. The company is also partnering with GasBuddy and CarAdvise to give drivers access to discounts on gas and car maintenance. Through GasBuddy, drivers can save up to 25 cents per gallon. The company is also offering additional pay based on estimated total miles driven for each calendar week. The total extra amount paid out for mileage increases with total weekly mileage to make sure drivers who go farther distances see a larger earning. GrubHub says it’s also monitoring the situation and will make changes as needed. Uber EatsUber Eats is adding a surcharge for customers of 35 to 45 cents on each order. That money will go directly to drivers. The surcharges are based on average trip distances and gas price increases in each state.

High gas prices are hitting everyone, but some people feeling it the most right now are food delivery drivers.

Now that delivering food is getting more expensive for them, drivers tell us they’re getting picky about which orders they accept. That means food delivery apps could lose their convenience for you.

Watch the video above: Our Chief National Consumer Correspondent Jeff Rossen talks with food delivery drivers about how we can help them get us our food at a faster rate.

What are companies doing for their drivers?

DoorDash

DoorDash launched a Gas Rewards program to offset elevated gas prices and preserve drivers’ earning potential. Drivers are able to earn 10% cash back on gas through a card called DasherDirect. This card can be used even when the drivers aren’t on the job.

The company also launched a “Weekly Gas Bonus for Those Who Dash Most” initiative. Each week, Dashers who accept and complete orders totaling 100 miles with their vehicle, will earn an extra $5. Those extra earnings will increase the more they deliver.

For example, for 175 miles, drivers earn an extra $10. These relief programs will be in place through April but the company says it will monitor prices to evolve the program as needed.

GrubHub

GrubHub says it’s increasing driver pay given current gas prices. The company is also partnering with GasBuddy and CarAdvise to give drivers access to discounts on gas and car maintenance. Through GasBuddy, drivers can save up to 25 cents per gallon.

The company is also offering additional pay based on estimated total miles driven for each calendar week. The total extra amount paid out for mileage increases with total weekly mileage to make sure drivers who go farther distances see a larger earning.

GrubHub says it’s also monitoring the situation and will make changes as needed.

Uber Eats

Uber Eats is adding a surcharge for customers of 35 to 45 cents on each order. That money will go directly to drivers.

The surcharges are based on average trip distances and gas price increases in each state.